Human Health Improved By Gardening

Horticulture has been used as therapy for centuries. In 1798, Dr. Benjamin Rush, a signer of the Declaration of Independence, wrote that gardening improved the conditions of mentally ill patients.

Gardening as a means of physical and occupational rehabilitation was employed in U.S. Grandmother With Granddaughter GardeningVeterans Administration hospitals for returning World War II veterans. The idea of using nature to improve human health and well-being gained credibility through research in the ‘70s and ‘80s.

The American Horticultural Therapy Association cites the following benefits of horticultural therapy:

  • Enhance self-esteem
  • Alleviate depression
  • Improve motor skills
  • Provide problem-solving opportunities
  • Encourage work adjustment
  • Support social interaction

Many long term care communities use gardening and horticultural therapy to help residents become re-involved with life.

While people of all ages and abilities can profit from simply viewing and growing plants, the advantages of people-plant interactions can be focused and enhanced with guidance from a horticultural therapist. Adaptive tools and therapeutic gardens often lend an even greater degree of accessibility and long lasting benefit.

Visit Our Beautiful Senior Living Communities in New Jersey Today

United Methodist Communities is a senior living organization dedicated to helping older adults to live full, happy lives. With an active community spirit, great amenities, spacious residential apartments, expert medical care, and tailored support services designed for independent living, we’re a welcoming space for seniors to really feel at home. All our support services are scalable, allowing your loved one to continue living as independently as possible even as his or her needs change. We are also able to provide care for Alzheimer’s and dementia residents. For more information, contact United Methodist Communities.